My conscience is better than yours

Regarding the recent Indiana hysteria over religious freedom, take religion out of it and look at it simply from the perspective of conscience.  Consider Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, Inc.
As evidenced by Apple’s app store policies, he reserves the right to choose which customers Apple will and will not serve, i.e., which apps it will and will not publish, based on what falls within Apple’s moral code.  Feel free to Google the app store policies to see for yourself.  Those policies are nothing short of an expression of the Apple conscience.  Yet, by threatening to pull Apple businesses out of Indiana on the basis of alleged discrimination built into a religious freedom law (Google that one too so you know the facts), Apple, via Mr. Cook, is unwilling to acknowledge that Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Indiana, or any other similarly-minded business in Indiana for that matter, has the same right to exercise its conscience.
Stated another way, Mr. Cook’s (and presumably Apple’s) position is this:  My moral code is superior to yours and you must abide by mine, by the force of law if necessary.  I am free to follow my conscience, but you are not.
Stop and absorb that.  It is the essence of the position held by those in uproar over this.  I am free to follow my conscience, but you are not.

Note to Apple

Added to the above, your willingness to pull out of Indiana for a law that allows citizens to assert their religious beliefs, compounded with your existing operations in Muslim countries where people can be put to death for homosexuality, put you at a level of hypocrisy that is simply immeasurable.

I currently own an iPhone, but your disdain for another’s conscience will be guiding me to exercise mine and look at Androids the next time around.  And I hope those on Apple’s board of directors will ask whether its CEO should be wandering off into the social engineering business, where he appears to be highly unqualified.

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